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Christian Friedrich Gille

Wiesenblumen (Meadow Flowers)

Oil on paper mounted on cardboard
26,535,6
10.4314.02
Wiesenblumen (Meadow Flowers)

Christian Friedrich Gille, from 1827 to 1830 a pupil of Johan Christian Clausen Dahl, was denied recognition as a painter in Dresden his whole life long. While on completion of his training he produced a number of composed works in an attempt to meet prevailing tastes, his want of commissions obliged him to earn a living in the applied arts, among other fields. Gille had begun painting oil studies from nature even before 1830, but in this particular field soon emancipated himself from Dahl so that he could find his own individual mode of expression. These studies were painted more out of personal passion than with an intent to sell. Most cannot be linked to any of the composed works.1 In Wiesenblumen Gille brings together studies of yellow composite flowers, bell flowers, rocket and sunflowers in a single work. Especially worthy of mention is not just Gille’s combination of several different studies on one and the same sheet, but also the botanical accuracy of his painting. Most of the known plant studies by him evince a much freer style. The previous owner of Wiesenblumen, the Dresden-based writer and collector Johann Friedrich Lahmann (1858–1937), is the man credited with having discovered the long-forgotten artist in 1899. In the course of his life, he amassed over 400 works by Gille, most of them studies and paintings. He gave some of the works in his collection to the cities of Bremen and Dresden, while most of them were sold at auction by Rudolph Lepke in Berlin 1938.2

The study under discussion here will be included in Gerd Spitzer's catalogue of works.


  1. Christian Friedrich Gille 1805–1899, exh. cat. Staatliche Kunstsammlung Dresden 1994, Dresden 1994. pp. 23 f.

  2. Ibid, pp. 28 f.

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